Connect with us

LoadedNaija Lists

Will Divorce Ruin My Life? [Yes Or No]

Published

on

Will Divorce Ruin My Life

Will divorce ruin my life?

To put it simply, divorce can throw your life into upheaval. As you begin to reestablish yourself, it can help to keep in mind that divorce doesn’t mean your life has ended. Rather, it signals a new beginning. However, you know; the financial effects of divorced are talked about in the “manosphere” part of the internet like the red pill forum which got quarantined from Reddit previously all of the time. There’s plenty of information on how to avoid financial ruin from a divorce if you look properly, even if you just went to lawyers sooner perhaps.

There are a lot of unknowns when everything you thought your life was changes. Even if divorce is a relief, you probably won’t know exactly how to move forward. You’ll probably wonder: Years and years of savings and investing can disappear in a blink of an eye, leaving a divorcee reeling and in a financial tailspin.

If you spend enough time perusing the internet, you’ll find no shortage of studies, statistics, facts about divorce. I sympathize with you on taking a massive financial hit, in additional to any emotional pain and suffering. At the end of the day, divorce is a situation where everyone losses, including your ex-wife.

Divorce is devastating. There is not an area of your life it does not affect, at least in the beginning. While there are still times I wonder why I had to endure such a heartbreaking experience, I am grateful for the opportunity it has given me to find a much greater love and live a far better life.

Insane story mate! What’s interesting is that divorce, as much as it usually sucks, it’s the solution that can make life good again. I’ve been in a few long term relationships that almost ended up in marriage and somehow, through the grace of god, I was able to dodge that bullet. The truth of the matter is that very very few of us, including myself, are mature and emotionally stable enough to succeed at marriage and, most importantly, to enjoy it. Love your work, yourself, your friends, your family, your life FIRST and then maybe consider marriage if it makes all those things better.

You are in the pilot’s seat and have control of your emotions, livelihood and other aspects of your life. No one can ruin your life, only your reactions to people and events can do this. It is fine to say, “Yes, he’s a jerk” but realize that you are no longer married and he is not in your sphere. Move on without him and leave the divorce behind. Why give up control and feel that someone else has the power to ruin your happiness? No one can make you happy or take it away. Same with events. A divorce is a big bump in the road, but choose not to let it ruin your existence.

Few words in the English language can elicit as negative a visceral response as that of divorce. Who knows what your little revelations or life-changing realizations will be. But that is part of the fun of getting to rebuild yourself after a divorce. Divorce is one of the worst destroyers of wealth. May you never have to go through one. Love birds beware. The following is a guest post from Financial Samurai reader and medical doctor, Xrayvsn. A divorced ruined his life but he clawed his way back.

The costs and consequences of divorce

People expect a divorce to impact themselves and their families emotionally. Fewer people take into consideration the physical effects of divorce on adults. Surprisingly, the potential health effects vary between men and women. As if the emotional toll isn’t rough enough, couples who split must then confront harsh financial realities. It’s not just the cost of getting the divorce, but also the often-extreme lifestyle shift that comes when one household severs into two.

I – Divorce as a risk with costly consequences at both private and collective levels.The realization of divorce risk generates two types of cost for the ex-spouses. First of all, divorce results in direct costs in the short term. In addition to the expenses linked to the procedure itself,  these costs mainly correspond to the overall decrease in the ex-spouses’ standard of living due to a loss of economies of scale after separation. This decrease is not generally distributed evenly between the former spouses. The main cause for this imbalance lies in each individual’s own income. When one of the spouses accounts for the majority of the couple’s income, his or her standard of living increases substantially following the divorce while that of the other spouse decreases. The second cause of asymmetry is linked to the presence of children and the fact that their main residence is at the home of one of the former spouses. This imbalance, along with the overall decrease in standard of living, may also push one of the two parties into poverty.

Children often wonder why a divorce is happening in their family. They will look for reasons, wondering if their parents no longer love each other, or if they have done something wrong. These feelings of guilt are a very common effect of divorce on children, but also one which can lead to many other issues. Guilt increases pressure, can lead to depression, stress, and other health problems. Providing context and counseling for a child to understand their role in a divorce can help reduce these feelings of guilt.

Divorce is difficult for all members of the family. For children, trying to understand the changing dynamics of the family may leave them distracted and confused. This interruption in their daily focus can mean one of the effects of divorce on children would be seen in their academic performance. The more distracted children are, the more likely they are to not be able to focus on their school work.

Divorce can be a difficult time for a family. Not only are the parents realizing new ways of relating to each other, but they are learning new ways to parent their children. When parents divorce, the effects of divorce on children can vary. Some children react to divorce in a natural and understanding way, while other children may struggle with the transition.

The consequences of a relationship break-up span a wide range of foreseeable and unforeseeable effects in the life courses of adult individuals, their parents, and their children. One consistent finding in the divorce literature concerns the gender gap in the financial consequences of divorce. While there are huge international differences, it appears that in every country, women are economically disadvantaged following a divorce. Men tend to lose little or no income after a divorce, while the financial losses for women can be substantial. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the financial consequences of union dissolution. We thereby consider both divorces and break-ups of unmarried cohabiting partners. First, we focus on the magnitude of the decrease in financial resources and the moderating effects of welfare state benefits. Second, we look at the coping strategies women employ to make up for their income losses. Third, we look at the position of lone mothers. Being a lone parent after a break-up turns out to be a very difficult situation, as the chances of ending up in poverty are high for single parents. Again, welfare states react quite differently to the challenges faced by lone parents, which results in a differential poverty risk for lone parents across countries.

Alongside these direct costs, divorce also generates indirect costs, resulting from decisions taken during the marriage, notably concerning marital investments. The costs in question stem, in part at least, from the fact that while relations within the couple were initially organized in a long-term perspective, the decision to divorce necessarily shortens the time horizon. The problem is posed in particular when one of the spouses has made specific long-term investments in the marriage and the divorce deprives him or her of the returns (Cohen, 1987). The economic literature provides concepts that are useful for analyzing the nature of these investments and their consequences. For economists of the family, marriage is a long-term contractual relation governed by law (Cigno, 1991). Divorce marks the termination of this contract, amicable or otherwise. From this viewpoint, marriage is at the root of a major problem if one of the spouses (say, partner A) has made specific investments in the domestic sphere (by caring for and raising the children or managing the household, by financing the other spouse’s education or early working career). These investments bear fruit in the medium or long term. Partner A (most often the woman) profits from the marriage partly at the time he or she makes the investment but mostly once the investment is completed. In contrast, the other spouse (say, partner B) profits from the marriage immediately but pays the costs only in the long term, when partner A’s yield decreases sharply (the children have grown up, the career of partner B who has invested in the job market no longer depends on partner A’s investment, and so on) while B continues to pay for A’s upkeep. So for partner A, divorce deprives him or her of a return on investment, partner B having profited from partner A’s investment without paying the long-term cost. Furthermore, domestic investments are hard to transfer to other domains. The skills acquired by partner A who devoted part or all of his or her time to domestic life are of little value on the job market.  As a result, divorce cancels out the value of the investment made during marriage.

Will Divorce Ruin My Life?

However, you know; the financial effects of divorced are talked about in the “manosphere” part of the internet like the redpill forum which got quarantined from Reddit previously all of the time. There’s plenty of information on how to avoid financial ruin from a divorce if you look properly, even if you just went to lawyers sooner perhaps.

There are a lot of unknowns when everything you thought your life was changes. Even if divorce is a relief, you probably won’t know exactly how to move forward. You’ll probably wonder: If you spend enough time perusing the internet, you’ll find no shortage of studies, statistics, facts about divorce.

I sympathize with you on taking a massive financial hit, in additional to any emotional pain and suffering. At the end of the day, divorce is a situation where everyone losses, including your ex-wife. Divorce is devastating. There is not an area of your life it does not affect, at least in the beginning. While there are still times I wonder why I had to endure such a heartbreaking experience, I am grateful for the opportunity it has given me to find a much greater love and live a far better life.

Who knows what your little revelations or life-changing realizations will be. But that is part of the fun of getting to rebuild yourself after a divorce. It is easy to let feelings about a divorce run one’s life. The hard part is saying “enough is enough” and letting go. When people stay entrenched in the past they can become bitter over their divorce. Having one’s divorce be their focal point can decrease life’s pleasures. Do you feel that your divorce has ruined your life? There are ways to get out of this rut.

Wow, thanks for sharing your harrowing tale. It really sounds like your divorce put you through the ringer. All that time spent in an unhappy marriage really can take a toll on a person. How Long Does It Take to Get Over a Divorce? And 4 Signs You are On Your Way There seems to be a study looking into almost every possible factor that might affect marriages and lead to divorce. These studies have yielded some extremely interesting and – in some cases – downright shocking information about divorce in both the United States and the rest of the world.

When it comes to getting over a divorce, there’s no rule book or timeline except the one that feels right for you. If you do nothing about your divorce recovery, you can expect very little to change about the way you are feeling. It will probably become more muddled and less pronounced. But did you grow from it? If you choose to support yourself by finding the help you need to really honor your beautiful life, you’ll discover the time it takes to get over your divorce will be just the right amount of time you need to move forward bravely and with grace.

Healing from a divorce is an undesired journey that no one signs up for….that in itself is the worst part of it…it is one of those things you are forced to deal with, not looking forward to. But like many other similar things, what you do with it is what will make the most difference……Accept that bad thing scan happen to good peoples is a key way to move on.

Will Divorce Ruin My Life - Marriage-children

Nearly half of all marriages in the United States end in divorce. This suggests that, for many people, divorce does not have a negative impact on their lives. Nonetheless, for some individuals, a divorce can be damaging. This is because the process of divorcing can be emotionally traumatic. Additionally, a divorce can cause financial difficulties. In many cases, one spouse may end up owing money to the other. Moreover, a divorce can create new social obligations. For example, a former spouse may be expected to host a party in honor of the other spouse’s new relationship.

Divorce remains one of the most stressful life events there are, and it does negatively affect the well-being of adults and children, financially, academically, professionally, and emotionally. Divorce is a process, and people tend to recover relatively quickly (not that there aren’t long-term effects—like the pain of divorce for kids extending into adulthood).

While divorce is a painful and stressful process, divorce is neither good nor bad. Most people experience major losses during their divorce—loss of future dreams, loss of family life as they knew it, loss of the familiar and financial loss. In spite of these losses, most people say that they do not regret their divorce and go on to lead fulfilling lives post-divorce, with the great majority recoupling within three years.

The effects associated with divorce affect the couple’s children in both the short and the long term. After divorce the couple often experience effects including, decreased levels of happiness, change in economic status, and emotional problems. The effects on children include academic, behavioral, and psychological problems. Studies suggest that children from divorced families are more likely to exhibit such behavioral issues than those from non-divorced families.

Divorce is almost always a financially costly and often draining burden, usually more on women than men. The divorce process is usually expensive. One person’s living expenses are always more than half of a couple’s. The upsets around the causes and effects of the divorce often interfere with or undermine work activities and thereby threaten career paths. If children are involved, all the above are made worse. In short, our economic system is poorly organized for the massive divorce problem it actually has. It thus makes an already difficult personal problem worse by its lack of support and disrespect for the economic dimensions.

Divorce is one of the worst things any couple can do from a financial perspective. In ESPlanner, personal financial planning software I’ve developed, we assume that two can live as cheaply as 1.6. Hence, divorce implies a 60 percent living standard decline for both spouses, other things equal and assuming that each spouse experiences the same percentage living standard reduction. And this is just the loss associated with discretionary spending, like food and clothing and entertainment. Divorce also requires having two, rather than one homes, two rather than one electric bills, the list goes on.

When a marriage ends, spouses and their children often face a perfect storm of stressful events: new living arrangements, parenting schedules, and of course, decisions about property and money. The emotions caused by these changes can make it difficult for spouses to understand the legal process of divorce, and may even impair their ability to make sound decisions. Getting through a divorce may be easier if you’re informed about the process before it begins. The following article provides a few tips to help guide you through this difficult time.

For heterosexual partners, divorce seems to bring targeted misery. Women usually rebound emotionally more quickly than men following divorce, but suffer more financially. This is slowly changing as women’s own earnings improve, but is still devastating for women who took time out of the labor force to raise kids and remain primary custodial parents to those children.

The Costs and Consequences of Divorce

The process of divorce and its aftermath is devastating, both emotionally and financially. People expect a divorce to impact themselves and their families emotionally. Fewer people take into consideration the physical effects of divorce on adults. Surprisingly, the potential health effects vary between men and women.

As if the emotional toll isn’t rough enough, couples who split must then confront harsh financial realities. It’s not just the cost of getting the divorce, but also the often-extreme lifestyle shift that comes when one household severs into two. I – Divorce as a risk with costly consequences at both private and collective levels

8The realization of divorce risk generates two types of cost for the ex-spouses. First of all, divorce results in direct costs in the short term. In addition to the expenses linked to the procedure itself,  these costs mainly correspond to the overall decrease in the ex-spouses’ standard of living due to a loss of economies of scale after separation. This decrease is not generally distributed evenly between the former spouses. The main cause for this imbalance lies in each individual’s own income. When one of the spouses accounts for the majority of the couple’s income, his or her standard of living increases substantially following the divorce while that of the other spouse decreases. The second cause of asymmetry is linked to the presence of children and the fact that their main residence is at the home of one of the former spouses. This imbalance, along with the overall decrease in standard of living, may also push one of the two parties into poverty.

A client once told me, “No happy marriage ends in divorce.” Whether you are trying to decide to work through marital problems or if you have concluded that it can only end with a divorce, you should keep in mind there can be both physical and emotional effects of divorce. The process of divorce and its effects on children can be a stressful. Dealing with these issues can take its toll, including physical problems. Children who have experienced divorce have a higher perceptibility to sickness, which can stem from many factors, including their difficulty going to sleep. Also, signs of depression can appear, exacerbating these feelings of loss of well-being, and deteriorating health signs.

Divorce is a complex process. As a result, it can have a variety of implications for the individuals involved. Some of the costs of divorce include: legal fees, financial settlements, lost income, and therapeutic expenses. Additionally, a divorce can lead to stress and anxiety. This is because it can be difficult to deal with the emotional fallout of the breakup. In some cases, stress can lead to depression or other mental health issues. Last but not least, a divorce can damage relationships with friends and family members. As a result, many people find it difficult to rebuild their social networks after a divorce.

People expect a divorce to impact themselves and their families emotionally. Fewer people take into consideration the physical effects of divorce on adults. Surprisingly, the potential health effects vary between men and women. For the lucky few, divorce can be relatively simple – deciding who gets what and going through the legal formalities, without too much undue pain beyond the regret that the relationship has ended. Often however, there are other influences, like childcare and money, that add strain and complexity to divorce proceedings.

Research suggests that separating out particular factors of the divorce, especially whether or not the divorce is accompanied by parental conflict, is key to determining whether divorce has a significant negative impact on children (Amato and Keith, 1991). Certainly while marital conflict does not provide an ideal child rearing environment, going through a divorce can also be damaging. Children are often confused and frightened by the threat to their family security. They may feel responsible for the divorce and attempt to bring their parents back together, often by sacrificing their own well-being (Amato, 2000). Only in high-conflict homes do children benefit from divorce and the subsequent decrease in conflict. The majority of divorces however come out of lower-conflict homes, and children from those homes are more negatively impacted by the stress of the divorce than the stress of unhappiness in the marriage (Amato, 2000).

Divorce and remarriage can be stressful for partners and children alike. Divorce is often justified by the notion that children are better off in a divorced family than in a family with parents who do not get along. Others argue that parents who divorce sacrifice their children’s well-being to pursue their own happiness.

The first thing to understand is that for everyone but the very wealthy, divorce will hurt your standard of living. Two households are more expensive to maintain than one, and if one person in the marriage has been a stay-at-home parent, there is less income and assets to go around. In many cases, a divorce has more impact on a person’s current and future financial well-being than any other event in their lives. Sound financial planning may be the last thing on your mind when your marriage ends — particularly if it ends in conflict — but it may never be more valuable.

It’s critical that people understand the economic consequences of getting divorced and that they also understand how each spouse will fare in the settlement. This is why we have introduced a service called Analyze My Divorce Settlement. This service tells each party exactly how they will fare after they get divorced, not just for a year or two, but over the longer term.

Women also tend to hold on to the stress of divorce longer than men. Scientists trace this to a sudden decrease in standard of living which can go on long after the divorce is final. It is true that most people bounce back. A psychological study of divorce related depression found that for most people these symptoms are temporary. The concern is people who have a history of depression. Men and women with a history of depression frequently have depressive episodes long after the divorce has finalized.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Young

    July 31, 2022 at 1:52 pm

    Wow this content is helpful

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Copyright © 2021-2022 LoadedNaija.Com.Ng