Connect with us

LoadedNaija Lists

10 Ways To Become Your Parent Favorite Child

Published

on

Parent Favorite Child

Way To Become Your Parents’ Favorite Child

Be patient with them and never give up on them.

Parents who discover the power of patience can find peace of mind and serenity as a parent. They accept that struggle and difficulty are part of everyday life and that a patient, optimistic approach will help them move forward more quickly than complaining, angry words and lingering resentment. Patient parents use effective problem-solving methods. They try to understand all aspects of the problem and think of as many solutions as possible. Many of their alternatives will be more creative and successful than the old ways of doing things.

But I’ve seen many young people successfully achieve it over time. Here are seven things mentally strong kids always do, and how to help your kids get there if they haven’t already: The power of patience helps effective parents deal calmly and rationally with day-to-day problems and annoyances. It lets them stay focused on the “bigger picture” and not get bogged down by daily hassles. Patience helps them maintain emotional stability even in times of crisis.

The following suggestions will help you to teach your child about being goodhearted and compassionate. But in the words of author/psychologist Dr. Julius Segal, nothing “will work in the absence of an indestructible link of caring between parent and child.” When you kiss your daughter’s boo-boos or read cozy bedtime stories to your son, you are giving your child the base that enables them to reach out to others.

You should not question their decisions or underestimate their ability to decide what’s best for you. Do your best. Realize that your parents may have unrealistic expectations and will never be satisfied when it comes to you. In fact, you may already be working hard to please your parents, only to find out that you can’t please them no matter what you do. Just remember that all you can do is your best.

There are several, but the type that will really help them become their best selves and get through life’s toughest challenges is mental strength. So, don’t beat yourself up if you have a favorite kid. But do keep favoritism in check and make sure your kids know that you have equally limitless love and support for them all. You can maintain healthy, fair relationships with everyone even if you really do have a favorite kid.

Let go of the guilt and remind yourself that it’s natural to get along with some people better than others. Likewise, it’s often unavoidable to connect more with one child. What’s important is to make an effort to bolster the bond with your other child or children as well, suggests Dr. Hokemeyer. Let kids help and give. Self-esteem grows when kids get to see that what they do matters to others. Kids can help out at home, do a service project at school, or do a favor for a sibling. Helping and kind acts build self-esteem and other good feeling.

Believe that your child is capable of being kind. “If you treat your kid as if he’s always up to no good, soon he will be up to no good,” Kohn cautions. “But if you assume that he does want to help and is concerned about other people’s needs, he will tend to live up to those expectations.”

Be patient with your little one. Kindness and compassion are learned and life presents challenging situations even to adults. Being a loving parent and a great role model will go a long way toward raising a wonderful, tolerant human being.

Listen to what they have to say and take their advice seriously.

Know Them Inside Out Take note of their idiosyncrasies, likes and dislikes. For example, if they like to read certain sections of the newspaper first, pore over the other pages first. Give and take will endear you to them, even if you have little in common. Use Reason, Not Force Parents often give well-meaning advice out of concern. Don’t resent this. Just assure them that you are wise enough to make your own decisions. “Reasoning often works but always speak to your parents in private if you disagree with anything. This way, you’re honouring them by not embarrassing them in front of others, and it reduces the need for them to show that they are in full control,” says Esther Ng, director of My Space Psychotherapy Services.

Obey Them The saying “Mum (or Dad) knows best” is usually true, so do what they say within reason. By obeying them, you’re showing that you respect and value their decisions. If you choose to disobey them, reassure them that you have considered their feelings and values.Listen To Them Patiently Yes, your dad is repeating that same story that happened eons ago for the 100th And mum is rehashing old gossips you’ve heard many times. “Take the time to reminisce with them. Encourage them to recount their stories from their youth and how they overcame obstacles,” says Samantha Chin, content specialist at Focus on the Family Singapore.

Don’t Lie To Them Sometimes the telling the truth hurts. But it’s worse when your parents find out that you’ve lied to them. They’ll have faith in you if you’re always upfront with them. Don’t make your parents guess what is important to you. Tell them and make sure you think things over first. If everything you bring up seems crucial, your parents will be confused about your priorities.

People, and yes, even children, will usually live up to our expectations if we manage them in a positive way. Letting them know, in advance, that you trust them to do the right thing will cultivate open communication lines and increase the likelihood the task will get completed. Give a copy of this to your parents. It might help them to see things more the way you do.

Think about it. The friends you like the most probably are honest with you, show up on time when you have someplace to go, know when to back off because you need some space, and don’t try to act like people they’re not. So, you respect who they are, care about them and like to be around them. Give your parents a chance to think things over. It isn’t fair to ask for something you want if you need an answer immediately. Allowing extra time also shows your parents that you think the issue is important enough to deserve attention from them.

If you don’t address this issue at its roots, you’re sure to see a simple case of “not listening” blossom into bigger behavior issues such as tantrums, defiance, and backtalk. Register for my free class called How to Get Kids to Listen, Without Nagging, Yelling or Losing Control. Classes run several times per week but I recommend you register early, as spaces are limited.

Try to pick a time to talk that is good for everyone. If your parents can’t talk to you at that moment, it doesn’t mean they’re not interested. Ask them to suggest a time that’s better for both of you. Before we dive into strategies to improve communication with your children, consider this question–What exactly are you referring to when you say your child “doesn’t listen?”

Make sure you are doing your best in everything you do.

Figure out small things that will make you seem more responsible and do them. Offer to take on small responsibilities and always do what you said you would do and a tiny bit more. So, when asking for something, also offer something in return. Two things you can always offer are doing specific chores and getting better grades in specific topics.

So, lower the rate of drama. Don’t cite unfairness towards you unless it’s blatant. When a sibling starts something, be the mature one and let it go. All this builds confidence and credit. And it helps build a platform for the eventual “Sure, I’ll get that for you.” If you show that you want to contribute to the family and don’t resent your responsibilities, you will start to be seen in a whole different light — a more grown-up light. When that happens, asking for things will have a much higher rate of success.

Don’t Lie To Them Sometimes the telling the truth hurts. But it’s worse when your parents find out that you’ve lied to them. They’ll have faith in you if you’re always upfront with them. Use Reason, Not Force Parents often give well-meaning advice out of concern. Don’t resent this. Just assure them that you are wise enough to make your own decisions. “Reasoning often works but always speak to your parents in private if you disagree with anything. This way, you’re honouring them by not embarrassing them in front of others, and it reduces the need for them to show that they are in full control,” says Esther Ng, director of My Space Psychotherapy Services.

Figure out why! Figure out the reason they turned you down and then ask what you have to do to make it a “Yes.” If you get a general, unhelpful response, dig further: “OK, you want me to be more mature. I want that too. How can I show you that?” The main thing you will need to prove to them is that you’re mature enough to deserve that thing you want. Don’t ask me why, but it does appear to be the case.

Be consistent. “If your rules vary from day to day in an unpredictable fashion or if you enforce them only intermittently, your child’s misbehavior is your fault, not his. Your most important disciplinary tool is consistency. Identify your non-negotiables. The more your authority is based on wisdom and not on power, the less your child will challenge it.”

Parents love to pretend they are cool and collected, but in reality, they are very predictable. So much so that I guarantee that if you read the tips below, you can improve your life in several ways! Your parents will allow you to do more, trust you more and be more willing to see life from your perspective.

“Parents forget to consider the child, to respect the child,” Natale tells WebMD. “You work on your relationships with other adults, your friendships, your marriage, dating. But what about your relationship with your child? If you have a good relationship, and you’re really in tune with your child, that’s what really matters. Then none of this will be an issue.”

Respect their decisions and always be aware of their feelings.

Allow them the time and the space to talk openly about their feelings without criticism or judgment. This is not the time to offer suggestions on how they can change or what they need to do differently. Instead, just listen and be empathetic. Be kind to yourself, and treat yourself with the same warmth, care and understanding you’d give to someone you care about.

Show kindness and respect in the way you speak about and behave towards other people. We should always work to make our relationships with them more united and strong. Instead, acknowledge the special bond they have and support it. It does not diminish your worth or value as a parent just because your child prefers the other parent.

Be accountable for your choices.Everyone appreciates someone who takes responsibility for his or her actions. If you make a mistake, apologize sincerely and solve any problems caused by your mistake. Celebrate Their Achievements Try to celebrate all their special occasions. At least call and say you’re thinking of them on their special day. No achievement should be too insignificant – even if it’s finally setting up their own Facebook account. They were there for your milestones, so do the same for them.

Know Them Inside Out Take note of their idiosyncrasies, likes and dislikes. For example, if they like to read certain sections of the newspaper first, pore over the other pages first. Give and take will endear you to them, even if you have little in common. You might even start a discussion with them about it, where you both challenge your own stance on issues by civilly arguing them out.

But the lesson we should take from this is that while they don’t expect anything from us but a little love every now and then, there are several material and non-material things that we can give back which can show our appreciation for them. Be kind.Kindness earns respect. Little gestures, like making coffee in the morning, or stopping to say “thanks” for they ways your parents support you, go a long way toward a more respectful relationship. Treat them the way you hope to be treated in return.

Try to do the things you say your child should do. Teenagers can and do notice when you don’t! And remember your worth is not defined by your child’s response to you. You have value despite what your child thinks. Remember, down the road, the tables may turn and you may be the parent that is no longer preferred.

Talk with them about the things they’re doing, what they’re interested in and care about, what they’ve been cooking, what they did that day, plans they have for the week, what they’ve been watching on tv, how their job is going, etc etc. Stop complaining. It’s hard to respect someone who is complaining and laying blame on others. While it’s okay to discuss problem relationships and attempt to sort out your feelings, if you’re blaming and complaining, you’re probably wasting your valuable time. Instead, try to work toward solutions. If you cannot think of ways to move forward, ask someone wise for ideas, but remain focused on resolving problems rather than running through a list of ways you’ve been wronged.

Help out around the house and be willing to pitch in whenever needed.

Help them organize events like birthdays, and help them clean out the house and box up items for donation. Take them out for coffee or shopping. Let them watch you cook, do the laundry or walk the dog. Let them help change a light bulb, plant herbs in the garden or help make a bed. Basically, anything you want them to help with later on in life, be sure they’re around while the activity is occurring.

They help do the laundry, help cook meals, help wash dishes. And they often do chores without being told. No gold stars or tie-ins to allowances needed. Be Attentive To Their Needs As your parents, they still want to protect you no matter how old you are – that’s why they prefer solving problems on their own instead of asking for your help. Be attuned to their needs, whether it’s taking them to the doctor when they’re ill or surprising them with dinner when they seem tired to cook. In other words, be indispensable.

Be willing to be your own individual without be ashamed of any quirks and unique interests. Don’t be lazy. One of the best things that you can do for your parents is to be helpful. Not only is it important to do your personal chores, but you can offer additional help with things like yardwork, putting the groceries away, preparing meals, doing the laundry, walking the dog, and washing the car.

Make sure that you do your chores. It’s best if your parents don’t have to keep asking you to do your chores. If you know what you have to do, whether it’s daily or weekly, make sure that you get it done. Establish a schedule or routine for chores. If a chore has a routine, it will become a habit. To help with this, establish a “when/then” routine. For example, “When you hang up your coat after school, then you can have a snack.” “When you’ve put their dishes in the dishwasher, then you can go outside and play.”

Make sure that you take good care of the things that your parents give you or allow you to use. For example, if they buy you a car or loan you their car, don’t trash it. “It’s a really complex term,” says Andrew Coppens, an education researcher at the University of New Hampshire, who collaborates with Rogoff. “It’s not just doing what you’re told, and it’s not just helping out. It’s knowing the kind of help that is situationally appropriate because you’re paying attention.”

Find out what his plans are after he’s finished. Motivate him to get the work done so that he can move on to what he wants to do. Show your parents that you can be responsible. Honoring your commitments, being trustworthy, taking care of things, finishing what you start and doing what you’re supposed to do is a delight to your parents and puts a smile on their face.

Volunteering to help is such an important trait in kids that Mexican families even have a term for it: acomedido. Try to do what your parents ask of you as best you can. For example, if they give you ten tasks to do and five of them seem impossible, make a huge effort on the other five to impress your parents. They deserve your efforts.

Ways To Become Your Parent Favorite Child

Be disposed to do things the right way, even if it means taking a little longer.

The key is that you don’t let the difficult situations cloud your judgment or cause you to make assumptions about the child you are struggling to parent at the time. Be Attentive To Their Needs As your parents, they still want to protect you no matter how old you are – that’s why they prefer solving problems on their own instead of asking for your help. Be attuned to their needs, whether it’s taking them to the doctor when they’re ill or surprising them with dinner when they seem tired to cook. In other words, be indispensable.

Offer your time and attention. You can be a consistent, reassuring presence for your grandkids. Try to make time to interact with them at the beginning of the day, when they come home from school, and before bed. Remember that while you may not have the energy you did when you were younger, you do have the wisdom that only comes with experience—an advantage that can make a huge difference in your grandchild’s life. Unlike first-time parents, you’ve done this before and learned from your mistakes. Don’t underestimate what you have to offer!

Set clear, age-appropriate house rules and enforce them consistently. Children feel more secure when they know what to expect. Loving boundaries tell the child that he or she is safe and protected. evaluated, and more general principles of implementation science, including considerations of capacity and readiness for scale-up and sustainability at the macro (e.g., current national politics) and micro (e.g., community resources) levels.

A healthy you means healthy grandchildren. If you don’t take care of your health, you won’t be able to take care of your grandchildren, either. Make it a priority to eat nutritious meals, exercise regularly, and get adequate sleep. Don’t let doctor’s appointments or medication refills slide. Get professional help from BetterHelp’s network of licensed therapists.

To ensure positive experiences for their children, parents draw on the resources of which they are aware or that are at their immediate disposal. No matter how old we are we still want to be our parent’s favourite child. Here’s how to become the apple of their eyes If school is hard for you, ask your mom or dad to spend some alone time with you each week to help with your homework.

Establish a routine. Routines and schedules help make a child’s world feel safe. Set a schedule for mealtimes and bedtimes. Create special rituals that you and your grandchildren can share on weekends or when getting ready for bed. Parents possess different levels and quality of access to knowledge that can guide the formation of their parenting attitudes and practices. As discussed in greater detail in Chapter 2, the parenting practices in which parents engage are influenced and informed by their knowledge, including facts and other information relevant to parenting, as well as skills gained through experience or education. Parenting practices also are influenced by attitudes, which in this context refer to parents’ viewpoints, perspectives, reactions, or settled ways of thinking with respect to the roles and importance of parents and parenting in children’s development, as well as parents’ responsibilities. Attitudes may be part of a set of beliefs shared within a cultural group and founded in common experiences, and they often direct the transformation of knowledge into practice.

Connect with parents with children. Even if you feel like you are from a different generation, the joys and tribulations of raising children can quickly form common bonds. It may take time, but forging friendships with parents of similar aged children can offer camaraderie and help on navigating the maze of issues facing children today.

Be a good role model for your siblings, regardless of how much you may disagree with them.

Spend time with them: Play games with your siblings and spend time with them. This makes them feel that they are an important part of your life and boosts their confidence. Try to do what your parents ask of you as best you can. For example, if they give you ten tasks to do and five of them seem impossible, make a huge effort on the other five to impress your parents. They deserve your efforts.

Sound off: Do you know how to be a role model to your kids? What would you add to the list? The single most important aspect of being your children’s role model is to always say what you mean and mean what you say. Walk the talk. Back up your words with visible and concrete action and be a man of integrity and value. Actions speak volumes. And as Benjamin Franklin pointed out, “Well done is better than well said.”

Love your parents the way they are. Do not feel embarrassed about your parents, and try not to mind what others think. Instead, if you see your parents forgetting things and making mistakes, give them more attention and care about them a little more. Having a younger sibling can be fun, but it is also about the responsibility of inculcating good habits in them and being someone they can follow. With a sibling around, one is usually careful about what one says or does. Invariably, the sibling tends to pick up and learn behaviours and attitudes pretty fast from the elder brother/sister, who is their role model. Here is how you can help them inculcate the right values…

Remember all the good things that your parents have done for you—and all that they still do. Be grateful and warmhearted toward them. If this is one of your family values, it’s important to teach everyone in your family how to be compassionate to themselves. By learning how to be kind to themselves, they’ll also learn how to be compassionate toward others.

being a positive role model in terms of your own coping mechanisms and use of alcohol and medication; Answer: Show love and respect and obey them as much as possible. Some 20 years ago or so, parents used to be so stubborn about their principles that it was very difficult to obey them. These days most parents are sensible in what they expect from us. Even if you differ in opinions, you can still talk to them.

Talk properly: Using slang is a big no. Use words like ‘Please’, ‘Thank you’, ‘Sorry’ frequently in your daily conversation with people at home.Avoid fights: Try to avoid getting into a fight with a friend when you are around your younger sister or brother. You don’t want her/him to pick up your ways, do you?

Teaching and prioritizing perseverance and hard work is a way to help your family not give up at the first signs of failure. This is a good list for most people to follow. I have an addition: Forgive your parents for what they did. Telling your kids stories about your childhood will help you remember all the good times you’ve had with your parents.

Make sure to spend quality time with your family, no matter what.

Make spending time with your family something you do on a daily basis. Have family meals together as often as possible, at the table with the TV off. This is a time when you can share what’s happening in your lives. Avoid screaming and yelling at your parents, even if you feel like they don’t hear you.

Make sure that you take good care of the things that your parents give you or allow you to use. For example, if they buy you a car or loan you their car, don’t trash it. Make it a point to have at least one meal together as a family. You could have breakfast or dinner together. We know that having lunch together every day is not possible because of your jobs but don’t let that stop you from spending time as a family Enjoy a meal together, share your thoughts and feelings, and spend quality time.

Make it a point to have at least one meal together as a family. You could have breakfast or dinner together. We know that having lunch together every day is not possible because of your jobs but don’t let that stop you from spending time as a family Enjoy a meal together, share your thoughts and feelings, and spend quality time.

Whether it’s a walk in the park on a Saturday morning, or accompanying your parents to the grocery store once a week, every effort to prioritise family time counts. Create an opportunity to do something exclusively together. Even committing to volunteering once a month at the local food pantry is a great way to spend time together as a family.

Once a month, go out on a field trip or picnic. And every year, plan a vacation to a place where you have never been before. Travelling and visiting places can be great fun and is a fantastic way to spend some quality time with your family. Once a month, go out on a field trip or picnic. And every year, plan a vacation to a place where you have never been before. Travelling and visiting places can be great fun and is a fantastic way to spend some quality time with your family.

Make sure that you do your chores. It’s best if your parents don’t have to keep asking you to do your chores. If you know what you have to do, whether it’s daily or weekly, make sure that you get it done. Here are some ideas that can make spending time with your family simple, meaningful and a part of your daily life.

Make it a point to bring your child to school or to any extra classes they may have. Doing this regularly allows you to spend more time together. Make travel time, together time! Find time to share stories about your family’s history. Dig out your old photo albums and look through them with your children. Add new pictures to the family collection together and make this a regular activity.

Show them you care by spending time with them even when there is nothing specific to do.

Spend time with them. There’s nothing like spending quality time with others to show you value the relationship. Try enjoying a picnic on a Saturday or go for a hike. If you have little ones, bring them along for a meaningful, multi-generational experience. Spend time with them. There’s nothing like spending quality time with others to show you value the relationship. Try enjoying a picnic on a Saturday or go for a hike. If you have little ones, bring them along for a meaningful, multi-generational experience.

Make spending time with your family something you do on a daily basis. Help around the house. Dedicate a Saturday afternoon to assisting them with chores like household cleaning and repairs or even handling their laundry as a treat. Want to put an eco-friendly spin on it? How about bringing over some homemade cleaning items like detergent or home scents?

Help around the house. Dedicate a Saturday afternoon to assisting them with chores like household cleaning and repairs or even handling their laundry as a treat. Want to put an eco-friendly spin on it? How about bringing over some homemade cleaning items like detergent or home scents? Have your children call their grandparents once in a while. Even if you visit each other often, a phone call from a grandchild is always special!

If you don’t live together, find time to call or text your parents regularly to say hello. Ask them how their day went. A few simple words can make a big difference. Be Attentive To Their Needs As your parents, they still want to protect you no matter how old you are – that’s why they prefer solving problems on their own instead of asking for your help. Be attuned to their needs, whether it’s taking them to the doctor when they’re ill or surprising them with dinner when they seem tired to cook. In other words, be indispensable.

Share a fond memory with them. It’s always fun to take a trip down memory lane. Remind your parents about something they did that meant a lot to you or tell them a story about your favorite childhood moments. Share a fond memory with them. It’s always fun to take a trip down memory lane. Remind your parents about something they did that meant a lot to you or tell them a story about your favorite childhood moments.

Not the lovey-dovey type? Parents can still demonstrate their love with small gestures. Morin suggests parents write notes and put it in their lunch, offer praise, give high fives, and say kind things about your kids in front of other people. “Your actions speak volumes about how much you care for them,” she insists. “They will feel loved when you do extra little things for them or when you say nice things about them.”

Your child wants to know they are important to you. A good way to do that? Make sure your child knows you’re interested in their thoughts. “Put down the electronics and show a genuine interest in what your kids have to say,” says Morin. “Talk to them, ask for their opinions about various real-world subjects, and demonstrate that their thoughts and ideas matter to you.”

Make them feel cherished and loved, even if they don’t show it outwardly all the time.

Continue to help them in appropriate ways if you feel it is healthy and necessary to do so. Be Attentive To Their Needs As your parents, they still want to protect you no matter how old you are – that’s why they prefer solving problems on their own instead of asking for your help. Be attuned to their needs, whether it’s taking them to the doctor when they’re ill or surprising them with dinner when they seem tired to cook. In other words, be indispensable.

Give them your support and guidance if they ask for it, but try not to force it on them. Prayer, meditation and time away from them actually help. We are empty nesters and that has been a big help. I am ashamed to say it but life with them in it is so, so hard and sad, and I feel so helpless sometimes.

If you have two or more children, making each feel loved, secure, and important takes a bit more planning and thought. How to do that? If it’s a partner, you might need to suggest activities they can do with the other kids. Or offer strategies for showing attention to each child. Love the child you have right now and try not to lose hope if they aren’t doing well.

There are small ways to express your love to your child so they feel it—and that feeling of a parent’s love can improve every aspect of their life. “This gives them the message they aren’t always going to be perfect, no one is, but that you have faith they will figure it out and they are competent to manage this,” says Dr. Gerak. At the same time, you are also building their confidence since you are helping them find ways to fix their mistakes rather than stepping in for them. A double win!

Show positive attention to whichever child is showing good behavior, and you might inspire others to follow suit. Give them the same space to follow their journey, just as you want others to do for you. Plan special dates together, at least once a month, with each child. Let them have some control over the activity you do. Also, aim to spend a few minutes every day with each child. Show positive attention and a genuine interest in time together to ensure that everyone feels loved and valued.

Think things through with the child.Sometimes it helps to talk through what would happen if a fear came true—how would she handle it? For some kids, having a plan can reduce the uncertainty in a healthy, effective way.

Try to model healthy ways of handling anxiety.Don’t pretend that you don’t experience stress and anxiety, but do let kids hear or see you managing it calmly, tolerating it and feeling good about getting through it.

Saying “I love you” to your child is very important, but don’t underestimate the power physical touch has in reinforcing the loving bond you have with your children. “Especially for teenagers, that no longer come running asking for it, they still need the physical reassurance—same as adults,” says Peg Sadie, a psychotherapist and self-care coach. “Make the effort to hug them each and every day as much as possible.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Copyright © 2021-2022 LoadedNaija.Com.Ng