Connect with us

LoadedNaija Lists

13 Strategies for Encouraging Kindness

Published

on

Encouraging Kindness

Be a role model for kindness.

Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them. Create a “Ways to be Helpful” book. Take photos of the kind acts you see in your family and school (holding a door open, cleaning your space, making grandma a get-well card, doing chores). Bind them in a book for meaningful reading.

It can be tempting to only do kind things for people we know but it is very powerful to carry out acts of kindness to complete strangers. You could host an It’s Cool To Be Kind Week where every child is tasked with carrying out an act of kindness in their local community. Be a good role model and try to be nice to people you interact with throughout the day. Be the behavior you want to see in your child.

Record acts of kindness. Take turns being the “kindness recorder.” For every act of kindness you see or experience, put a heart in a basket or an artificial flower in a pot. Share some of the kind acts at dinner or bedtime. To nurture kindness in kids, try incorporating some of these practices into your daily routines.

One of the best ways to teach kindness in the classroom is to model being kind to others. I always introduce our custodian to our class the first day of school and regularly thank her for all that she does in front of the class. It soon spreads and I hear my students begin to thank her when she’s working in the room. I also make it a point to be overly kind to our cafeteria staff in front of the students. Soon, they start to treat the cafeteria staff just as respectfully and kindly. Our students look to us as models for what’s expected, and if we are treating others kindly, they will follow suit.

Write notes of kindness. As you express your appreciation to others, be specific about what they did and how it helped you. Leave letters around the house, on pillows, in lunchboxes, and in the car. Kindness is a vital life skill that not only grows children’s emotional intelligence but teaches them the importance of looking after others as well as themselves. Give these ideas a go to raise the profile of kindness in your school!

When you encourage kindness in your child, they will feel better not only about the world they live in but also about themself. That’s the thing about raising a good child who is kind: not only will kindness lift up your child and the others around them, it will help them grow to be a happy and loving person.

Play kindness charades. Family members or classmates can act out the kindness they have received from others. The observers can try to guess who the helpful person was. Kids are hard-wired to have empathy for others and want to help. Parents, caregivers, and teachers can take advantage of these natural instincts that we’re all born with and encourage kids to practice kindness in their everyday lives.​

Teach kindness at home.

To nurture kindness in kids, try incorporating some of these practices into your daily routines. There are some easy steps to build empathy and kindness in your children. One of the best ways to teach kindness in the classroom is to model being kind to others. I always introduce our custodian to our class the first day of school and regularly thank her for all that she does in front of the class. It soon spreads and I hear my students begin to thank her when she’s working in the room. I also make it a point to be overly kind to our cafeteria staff in front of the students. Soon, they start to treat the cafeteria staff just as respectfully and kindly. Our students look to us as models for what’s expected, and if we are treating others kindly, they will follow suit.

Teach your child that even small acts of kindness go along way. Express to your child why you are holding the door for another person, letting someone get in front of you in traffic or helping someone when their hands are full. Explain that it is nice to be helpful, even if the person doesn’t say thank you or appreciate it. You should give to give – not give to get.

Be an example for your children and help strangers, friends and family. Let them know that it feels good to help others – even if you get nothing back. Set up opportunities for you to help others as a family. So, how do you help teach your kids to be kind and not turn into a bully? Be a good role model and try to be nice to people you interact with throughout the day. Be the behavior you want to see in your child.

If you allow your child to talk rudely to you – they might think it is acceptable to talk to others that way as well. Kindness starts at home. The adage about saying nothing at all if you don’t have something nice to say about someone is a good lesson in kindness to teach kids. Teach your child to get into the habit of saying only positive things—the sort of things that will make someone feel good rather than sad. Teach them to hold their tongue when they have a negative opinion about something. For example, if their friend asks them whether they like a drawing they did and they didn’t like it, they can practice finding something positive about it. “I liked the colors you used,” or “You made a nice, big house” or something similar is great. They should not mention what they did not like about it. Another example: If a classmate isn’t very good at sports, your child can offer encouragement and praise the classmate for trying.

Kids are hard-wired to have empathy for others and want to help. Parents, caregivers, and teachers can take advantage of these natural instincts that we’re all born with and encourage kids to practice kindness in their everyday lives.​ We spend several months focused on learning “The 7 Habits of Happy Kids.” One very important habit that helps students learn to be kind to others, especially when dealing with conflict, is “Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood.” This helps students see each other through a kindness lens and appreciate what each other is feeling.

Kindness is a selfless act that should be a clear manifestation of virtue, not a manipulation. You wouldn’t think that you need to be teaching your kid to be kind – but, Like reading and writing – The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. If you tell your child to be kind, but you are modeling negative, unkind behavior – your words will have little impact on their behavior. Children do as they see – not as you tell them to do. Be a wonderful role model for your child.

It’s also a good idea to get kids into the habit of being friendly and finding something nice to say to someone. (That said, a child should know the basics of how to protect themself from stranger and acquaintance danger and should know what to do if they ever get lost.) Let your child see you tell the checkout person at the supermarket to have a nice day, thank a waiter for serving you, or compliment a neighbor on the hard work they did in their garden.

Celebrate kindness.

Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them. Write notes of kindness. As you express your appreciation to others, be specific about what they did and how it helped you. Leave letters around the house, on pillows, in lunchboxes, and in the car.

Record acts of kindness. Take turns being the “kindness recorder.” For every act of kindness you see or experience, put a heart in a basket or an artificial flower in a pot. Share some of the kind acts at dinner or bedtime. Leave a comment below and tell us how you foster kindness in the classroom! Play kindness charades. Family members or classmates can act out the kindness they have received from others. The observers can try to guess who the helpful person was.

Create a “Ways to be Helpful” book. Take photos of the kind acts you see in your family and school (holding a door open, cleaning your space, making grandma a get-well card, doing chores). Bind them in a book for meaningful reading. Partner up classes to send each other kindness cards. Deliver sweet treats to custodians, administration, cafeteria staff, and students’ former teachers. Invite students to perform Random Acts of Kindness (RAKs) for others. Staff members can even write each other compliments! The list of ways to promote kindness during this week is endless. Throw kindness around like confetti!

Kindness starts with how we treat ourselves. Encourage your students to commit to at least one action a day that benefits their bodies and minds. Some ideas are listening to music, taking a walk with a friend, getting more sleep or making healthier eating choices. Making self-care a priority promotes well-being and helps students be at their best when it’s time to learn at school.

This 2 minute video is a great way to open a discussion about kindness with preschoolers. The Random Acts of Kindness website includes inspiration, ideas and resources you can use to teach and foster kindness in students throughout the year. Here’s a few of our favourites: Use a range of resources: personal stories, art, drama, discussion of current events, movies, photos, books and technology to explore positive social behaviour

Charitable activities are a great way to help students deepen their empathy and compassion for the circumstances of others. Know a local organization that could use some support? Organize a bake sale fundraiser, or plan a food or clothing drive to collect money and goods for those who need them the most.

Teach the behaviour that is expected in class explicitly, in the playground, in small groups, at transition times during the day, etc. When one act of kindness is conducted between classmates, the recipient(s) of the act pass on a new act of kindness to another classmate until the entire classroom family has experienced at least one act of kindness that was bestowed upon them at closing circle (yep, like morning circle but at the end of the day). Repeat 🙂

Pass on kindness.

Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them. The world would be a completely different place if we all practiced daily random acts of kindness. In addition to these acts of kindness, there are a few methods of teaching kindness we’d be remiss if we ignored!

Before you speak, think and be smart. It’s hard to fix a wrinkled heart. The world would be a completely different place if we all practiced daily random acts of kindness. Next time you come across someone having a tough day, use some of these ideas to show some kindness and bring a smile to their face. So … go out and make someone’s day a little better!

Write some ways you might strengthen your empathy by caring for others. Put a sticky note on your bathroom mirror, wishing family members a good day Spread some encouragement online with an inspirational quote or motivational message Clean out a closet and donate to your local hospice shop or Goodwill store

Listen, it’s easy to be kind to others when they’re kind to us. But when others are unkind or downright rude, it can be hard to maintain our kind demeanor. Take your kids outside with some sidewalk chalk and let them share the love with everyone who passes by! They can write kind notes or do something more simple like drawing a rainbow just to make people smile.

I had to show them how to be kind even when I didn’t really feel like it. So if you want to encourage more kindness in your kids, and in the world, here are some fun things you can do: We wanted to share some ideas you can utilize to spread your own kindness. Try putting some of the following acts of kindness ideas to work and put a big smile on a few faces!

To nurture kindness in kids, try incorporating some of these practices into your daily routines. Be generous with “thank you’s;” Thank your barista, the police officer who waves you through, or kid who bags your groceries Record acts of kindness. Take turns being the “kindness recorder.” For every act of kindness you see or experience, put a heart in a basket or an artificial flower in a pot. Share some of the kind acts at dinner or bedtime.

Being kind to others feels good. It helps take our attention off of our own troubles, and also creates a feeling of interconnectedness. Together, we can make the world a better place with acts of kindness both big and small. Let’s make kindness the new cool. But let’s face it. It’s not always easy to be kind, even for us. Even grown-ups don’t want to share our toys sometimes. Helping others can seem hard when we feel like we don’t have the help we need ourselves.

Be kind to yourself.

In addition, tell yourself that nothing has to happen to make you worthy. You are already enough. Be kind to yourself by finding the sweet spot between being happy with who you are, while taking action to become even better. Write Post-It notes with encouraging messages and leave them in library books.

If you’re angry at yourself, you need to show yourself kindness: stop blaming yourself, resolve to do better from now on, and forgive yourself. Tell yourself it’s going to be OK. Give yourself a morale boost by reminding yourself of your past successes. Then, come up with a plan for dealing with what happened, and take action.

Try not to judge yourself too quickly. Another tip from DiPirro is to stop assuming you’ll behave a certain way. It’s easy to assume things like “I get really grumpy and antisocial on flights”, which sometimes precludes the possibility that you’ll act a different way. This is once again about treating yourself as you would others, and just a future-focused way to give yourself the benefit of the doubt.

Perhaps you failed to stand up for yourself and you let someone else get the better of you. Maybe you’ve been harsh with someone, only to be much harsher with yourself later? Instead of setting a standard of “perfection” for yourself, aim to improve, one step at a time. 11. Tell Yourself, “I Am Enough”. We’ve all had times in our lives when we’ve thought, “I’m not good looking enough, or smart enough, or strong enough to get what I want.” Stop it with the “I’m not enough” self-talk and replace it with the following;

Lock your bedroom door, turn on some music, and dance around in your underwear. In order to recognize yourself as a friend, you have to be kind to yourself. If you’re not sure how to do this, you’re in the right place. Thank you for sharing such kind thoughts and actions. I am ashamed that I had to read your post to rekindle in me the basic principles of kindness. Unfortunately I have been plodding on blindly and directionlessly (not sure if this is a word!) in life without considering the impact of my words and actions on others.

Try giving compliments, being supportive when someone makes a mistake, and being helpful without being too pushy. With that, students will learn to be kind from the example you provided. Go visit your parents. Tell them how much you appreciate them (or at least one thing about them you appreciate). Try self-acceptance. This means embracing your own perceived shortcomings as well as your character strengths (Morgado et al., 2014). Self-compassion is about not over-inflating these shortcomings into a definition of who we are—rather, thoughts and feelings are behaviors and states (Neff, 2010).

Believe In Yourself. Part of being kind to yourself is wanting the best for yourself. And in order to get the best, you have to believe in yourself. Have faith in your own abilities and in your own judgment. Think highly of yourself: believe in yourself. Reminding yourself that others also feel inadequate at times, when you feel the same.

Be kind to others.

Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them. Write Post-It notes with encouraging messages and leave them in library books.

 Be nice to new people Share the title of a great book you’ve just finished reading Bring peace wherever you are Treat others with Integrity!

Here are four ways to bridge the kindness gap and raise kids who aren’t jerks. Greet strangers, help people pick what they mistakenly dropped on the floor, be ‘big’ enough to loose battles , let things go to those who need them more, smile at children it builds their confidence….remember to enquire about a significant life event, say happy birthday, listen to their stories, let them show you their pictures and tell you the stories behind each

Try giving compliments, being supportive when someone makes a mistake, and being helpful without being too pushy. With that, students will learn to be kind from the example you provided. If you see someone being or doing something nice, point it out to your child. Record acts of kindness. Take turns being the “kindness recorder.” For every act of kindness you see or experience, put a heart in a basket or an artificial flower in a pot. Share some of the kind acts at dinner or bedtime.

Listen, it’s easy to be kind to others when they’re kind to us. But when others are unkind or downright rude, it can be hard to maintain our kind demeanor. Create a “Ways to be Helpful” book. Take photos of the kind acts you see in your family and school (holding a door open, cleaning your space, making grandma a get-well card, doing chores). Bind them in a book for meaningful reading.

Whether it’s with loved ones or strangers, it never hurts to treat people with kindness. Here are 87 ideas – and a free activity – to #GrowKindness Thank you for sharing such kind thoughts and actions. I am ashamed that I had to read your post to rekindle in me the basic principles of kindness. Unfortunately I have been plodding on blindly and directionlessly (not sure if this is a word!) in life without considering the impact of my words and actions on others.

Strategies for Encouraging Kindness

Show kindness to animals.

Play pretend and let your children “practice” being kind to animals while they play. Team up with your children to write letters to local legislators promoting anti-cruelty and animal humane laws. What’s your favorite way to be kind to animals? Leave a comment below or message me on Facebook and let me know!

Clean up the community – for animals! Wherever you are – at home or on a family vacation – make a positive impact on the environment by tidying up wildlife habitats. You can do it as a family or as part of a community event! Check for community, park and beach clean up days in local papers and on Facebook and get involved! This also helps you meet like-minded friends along your journey. Picking up litter at the beach, in parks, and even in the school yard is an easy way to help keep animals safe. Wildlife can get tangled or trapped in our trash, injured by eating garbage or sick from polluted water. By getting involved in a clean-up, your family can make a real difference for the wildlife that share our spaces.

Volunteer at a local homeless pet shelter. Shelters rely on volunteers to help feed their wards, walk dogs, clean cages and more. Can you think of an example where an animal is kind to or helps a human? Learn about people who care for animals every day such as veterinarians, animal control officers and animal rescue workers and volunteers. Download our free printable kindness postcards and send them a note to tell them how much you appreciate what they do to be kind to animals too!

Young people are naturally fascinated by and drawn to animals. Let’s encourage this natural instinct and empower them to share kindness with and on behalf of the animal kingdom. Emphasize the importance of providing food, fresh water, and regular exercise to be kind to animals under your care. Don’t forget to also emphasize the importance of providing regular companionship and love – animals feel loneliness, just like we do.

Teach little ones about pet care with a well-loved stuffed animal. Don’t forget to include a visit to the vet and encourage kids to talk about how their “pet” is feeling and what their “pet” needs. One of the easiest ways to teach children about kindness and empathy is to start by helping them learn about treating animals well. In Jewish teaching, compassion, one of the highest virtues, is extended to animals as well as to humans. Tz’ar ba’alei chayim or kindness to animals, is a mitzvah that can easily engage young children and the whole family. The simple activities nurture compassion towards animals while providing opportunities for family fun and togetherness.

Donate to local animal organizations. From homeless pet shelters and catch/neuter/release groups to animal sanctuaries, your donation can make a world of difference. Monetary donations are always needed, but even bags of pet food, cat litter, pet medicine and other supplies are appreciated. Little acts to help the environment benefit animals too. When you cut six pack beverage holders up, properly store and sort recycling and trash, you help protect wild and stray animals. Using environmentally friendly soaps and cleaners also helps protect our oceans.

Visiting a local animal shelter will teach your child about the positive and negative impacts humans can have on other animals. Thousands of healthy, unwanted dogs and cats are abandoned and euthanised every year due to human actions. Animal shelters play a crucial role in rehoming abandoned animals and giving them a second chance to find a loving home. You can help your child make a difference by donating food and blankets or making handmade pet toys for shelter dogs and cats. Creating signs and posters to educate the local community on responsible pet guardianship is another way you can work together to create awareness. By practising active citizenship in your community and participating in volunteer work, your child will feel empowered in their ability to make a positive change to the lives of others.

Celebrate the everyday moments of kindness.

Encourage children to perform little acts of kindness for others on a regular basis. Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them. 1. Throw kindness around like confetti—as in, all over the school campus.

Record acts of kindness. Take turns being the “kindness recorder.” For every act of kindness you see or experience, put a heart in a basket or an artificial flower in a pot. Share some of the kind acts at dinner or bedtime. 6. Start an after-school Kindness Club where kids learn how to spread kindness and encourage others to do the same.

On World Kindness Day, groups and individual people are encouraged to go out of their way to be kind to others, whether that be at home, work, school, or just out in public. Celebrate by pledging to do at least one intentional act of kindness on that day to benefit someone else. It can be as straightforward or as involved as you like. No matter what you decide to do, your act of kindness will unite you with others dedicated to changing the world one kind act at a time.

Whether it is supporting others emotionally on a bad day, helping with chores, or including others, random acts of kindness makes us feel good​. Check out our list of different ways you can celebrate this World Kindness day with your kids – they’re all simple, practical tasks that won’t cost anything and you can practice every day at home!

Take your kids outside with some sidewalk chalk and let them share the love with everyone who passes by! They can write kind notes or do something more simple like drawing a rainbow just to make people smile. In addition to these acts of kindness, there are a few methods of teaching kindness we’d be remiss if we ignored!

Using kind words and modeling being kind even when you don’t feel like it is a great way to teach children the true meaning of kindness. Create a “Ways to be Helpful” book. Take photos of the kind acts you see in your family and school (holding a door open, cleaning your space, making grandma a get-well card, doing chores). Bind them in a book for meaningful reading.

Kindness is cool! And there are lots of easy ways to spread good vibes. This activity can be a good way to start the day, end the day, or simply encourage community and kindness at any time. Write notes of kindness. As you express your appreciation to others, be specific about what they did and how it helped you. Leave letters around the house, on pillows, in lunchboxes, and in the car.

Respond kindly to difficult situations.

Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them.

Be polite on the road Respect other people’s time and arrive on time Buy a coworker a cup of coffee or a donut and place it on their disk with a kind note Respect other people’s belongings and territory Lift up someone’s spirit.

Be positive and don’t weigh others whenever you meet them with your problems.

Help others with job opportunities Donate blood Give you pen to someone who needs it Send thank you notes or messages.

Be nice to new people Share the title of a great book you’ve just finished reading Bring peace wherever you are Treat others with Integrity!

Greet strangers, help people pick what they mistakenly dropped on the floor, be ‘big’ enough to loose battles , let things go to those who need them more, smile at children it builds their confidence….remember to enquire about a significant life event, say happy birthday, listen to their stories, let them show you their pictures and tell you the stories behind each

Try giving compliments, being supportive when someone makes a mistake, and being helpful without being too pushy. With that, students will learn to be kind from the example you provided. 1. Throw kindness around like confetti—as in, all over the school campus. Greet students and staff with sidewalk notes that remind them that anything is possible, kindness is cool, and more.

Model, Model, Model. Show your children what it means to have compassion toward others and toward yourself. Be sure your interactions with children are lead with compassion. 1. Believe that your child is capable of being kind. “If you treat your kid as if he’s always up to no good, soon he will be up to no good,” Kohn cautions. “But if you assume that he does want to help and is concerned about other people’s needs, he will tend to live up to those expectations.”

Encourage students to practice kindness by modeling it yourself. When we are kind to others, they may be more likely to be kind in return. Write Post-It notes with encouraging messages and leave them in library books. 11. Deck the halls (and stalls) with powerful messages of kindness and positivity.

When your children are involved in social interactions and building relationships, be sure to observe and praise them when noticing compassionate behavior. Point out compassionate behavior in others as well. Help your children notice how it feels to be kind—and how other people respond. My own teenagers still remember a time long ago when they were given free Munchkins at Dunkin’ Donuts because our server was so touched by their friendly politeness. “Kindness doesn’t only have to be altruistic,” my 19-year-old son said to me recently, and he’s right. You can practice it for the rewards and because it feels good.

If you see someone being or doing something nice, point it out to your child. Practice affirmations and visualizations of kindness toward others. Many mindfulness programs also have kindness initiatives connected to them, and one key strategy is to have periods in the school day when students send out compassionate thoughts to their classmates, others in school, and beyond to the community, state, country, and world. One simple formula, directed outward is: ”May you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be peaceful.” Picturing acts of kindness towards others can translate into kind behaviors.

Get involved in promoting kindness.

Start an after-school Kindness Club where kids learn how to spread kindness and encourage others to do the same. Model acts of kindness. Help all those you can. When you notice others who seem to be behaving in a hurtful way, take a breath and wish them well instead of judging them. 1. Throw kindness around like confetti—as in, all over the school campus.

Explain why being kind is important, and model how to be kind yourself. Be an example for your children and help strangers, friends and family. Let them know that it feels good to help others – even if you get nothing back. Set up opportunities for you to help others as a family. These activities and acts of kindness will help children interact and engage with the world around them in a compassionate and empathetic way:

Treat your kids with respect by treating them kindly yourself. It will help them understand the power of kindness. Create a “Ways to be Helpful” book. Take photos of the kind acts you see in your family and school (holding a door open, cleaning your space, making grandma a get-well card, doing chores). Bind them in a book for meaningful reading.

Encourage kids to help others whenever they can. Demonstrate with your actions how it feels good when someone does something nice for you and help them develop a love for blessing people in this way. Record acts of kindness. Take turns being the “kindness recorder.” For every act of kindness you see or experience, put a heart in a basket or an artificial flower in a pot. Share some of the kind acts at dinner or bedtime.

In addition to these acts of kindness, there are a few methods of teaching kindness we’d be remiss if we ignored! With this in mind, here are ways to encourage more kindness in your classroom so that you and your children benefit: Encourage students to practice kindness by modeling it yourself. When we are kind to others, they may be more likely to be kind in return.

Become a positive role model as children learn the ethical values by observing elders. When you practice honesty, fairness, and caring, children see and learn it quickly. Let your kid see the act of kindness that you perform to others. It can be as simple as dropping your neighbor to the grocery store. For babies, you can start conversing like, ‘a little bit food for baby, a little bit food for mommy’.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Copyright © 2021-2022 LoadedNaija.Com.Ng